VB Cable Setup and Streaming

This tutorial is a variation on a previous tutorial, the difference being using VB Cable and the tools located at their website. The theory is the same as the last tutorial, but I have been meaning to write up a new one since I switched to using these tools instead of VAC.

The advantages to me so far from VAC to VB Cable are ease of use as well as less issues. When using VAC I would run into instances where the extra audio cables would start performing badly or just crashing. I could also get random BSODs as well. I reached out to a few people and they said it had to do with how the timing of the audio channels interacted with the CPU timing. I didn’t dig that far into it. Just know that if you are having similar issues that I have had no issues whatsoever with VB Cables.

VB Cable offers the option to download more than one Virtual Cable for a donation from their site. I personally donated to them to support the project, but for this tutorial you will only need the free downloads from their site to get up and running. They also offer a software mixer to put all of this together named VoiceMeter.

To reiterate from the previous tutorial. The goal, and the reason why we are going through all this trouble is that we want more control over what sound goes out to our stream or recorded into our video. In the end you will be able to control your microphone, Mumble audio and game audio all independently and select which are streamed/recorded.

Download and install VB Cable and Voice Meter. Reboot when completed.

VB Cable – http://vbaudio.jcedeveloppement.com/Download_CABLE/VBCABLEDriver_Pack42b.zip
Voice Meter – http://vb-audio.pagesperso-orange.fr/Voicemeeter/index.htm

Now let’s open up our sound properties and set our default devices properly.

Sound playback, you should set the VoiceMeter Input as your default output device. Right click on that device and set it to your default device. What this will do, is make it so that the default playback will be the mixed output from the VoiceMeter mixer. In this screenshot the free devices that you will have installed on your system are outlined in blue. If you were to get the extra cables as well you can see those outlined in red.

Playback
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Playback Devices

Now to sound recording. In this menu find your recording device and make sure that it is properly set as the default device.

Recording Devices
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Recording Devices

Open up the game or program that you want to stream and enter the sound settings. For my example I’ll go into the World of Warcraft sound settings. Find your way to the “Game Sound Output” menu. Select the “VoiceMeter Input” as the default sound device for the game. Remember this, as we will need to remember which device we selected when we get to playing with the mixer in a bit.

Warcraft Sound Options
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Warcraft Sound Options

Now open up Mumble go to the Configure menu and Settings. First you may need to make sure that you have the “Advanced Options” checkbox checked, it is located at the bottom left of this screen. It will give you extra options, such as Audio Input and Audio Output as separate menus.

Make sure that your Audio Input, your microphone, for Mumble is directly set as the device inside Mumble. Many times this could be set to default device or something else. Just make sure your device is selected here, it eliminate potential issues later.

Mumble Input
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Mumble Input

On to the Audio Output section. This is where we will utilize the VB Cable that we installed. We want to do this to isolate the Mumble output to it’s own channel that we can then mix in/out as needed with the mixer later. Select the VB Cable Input from the dropdown.

Mumble Output
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Mumble Output

Now to the part that might not make sense right away but stay with me for a minute. Open OBS and go into the Audio settings. Here we set the “Desktop Audio Device” to “Default”. This doesn’t entirely matter what you set it to, so leaving it at default is fine. The next important, probably most important step so far is to set your “Microphone/Auxiliary Audio Device” to be the “VoiceMeter Output”.

OBS Audio Settings
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OBS Audio Settings

What this will do is take our mixed channel from the mixer, and use it as the microphone input. This is how all the sound will come into the stream, through the microphone device. On your main OBS screen you can just mute the audio, and leave the microphone enabled. You can mute this by just clicking on it. It will grey out when muted.

OBS Stream Sound
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OBS Stream Sound

Open up the VoiceMeter Mixer Application and we will go over the basics you need to know to mix channels and setup sound for your stream/recording like you want. When you open it up you will have four columns, each representing a channel of audio. We will cover some basics of the application now. The fader gains will manage the volume of each channel. The IntelliPan section will alter the sound to your liking for those two mixed channels. The Audibility knob will make that channel stand out a bit more from the others. The “M” at the bottom is the mute for the channel.

Voice Meter
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Voice Meter

The two left channels have drop downs so you can select which device they are managing into the mix. The left one I usually select my Microphone. The second one I select the VB Cable that we decided to use in the Warcraft sound setup from before. In this case it is the ‘Cable Output”.

Cable Input
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Cable Input

The far right column is your output from the mixer. It has two sides, A and B. B is the output from the mixer. B is what goes to OBS as ‘VoiceMeter Output’. A you can select to go wherever you like. In my example I want it to go to my headphones. There is an A1 and A2 so you can actually output to more sources. Maybe you have a second person with you and you want to output to their headphones, or some speakers too or a TV, etc.

VoiceMeter Output
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VoiceMeter Output

Now to control how you can exclude/add channels to your stream/recording. Reference the diagram above of the entire VoiceMeter application. On each of the 3 left channels you can see an “A” and “B” button on each channel. This will determine which output channel they are mixed to.

My outputs were “A1” to my Headset, and “B” is the output of the Mixer. For my microphone channel I just want that to go to the Mixer output. If I would select A as well, you would hear yourself talking in your headset. The next column remember is the Mumble mix. I currently have it set to the “A” channel, meaning all the people talking in Mumble are only going to my headset. If I want to add Mumble to the recording/stream I would also select the “B” option here. This is the main way that I control when Mumble goes over my stream or not. The third column is the mix coming from Warcraft, and actually all Windows sounds since we set that device as the default Windows output as well. I have it set to “A” and “B” because I want it going to my headphones and my stream. Also, now that you have set your default Windows output as the VoiceMeter input. You will need to always have the VoiceMeter mixer running to hear any sound, even when not streaming. If this bothers you you can switch the default audio device. The VoiceMeter application can be set to start with Windows in the settings too.

I should point out how I manage my microphone between Mumble and the Recording/Stream. My microphone is always hot to my stream. Whenever I say anything it goes to the stream. I can mute it in the mixer or my headset when I put the boom all the way up this will mute it as well. To get my microphone to go to Mumble I use a push to talk key. When I push to talk the Microphone is hot to Mumble and the Stream.

This should be enough to get you more easily and reliably controlling what audio gets mixed into your recordings and streaming. Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoyed the tutorial. If you have any other questions feel free to reach out on Twitter @Nicarras.

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